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Marine Corps Systems Command

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MCSC volunteers lead the way in community service

By Jim Katzaman, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command | April 29, 2015

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Randolph Scott served in the Marine Corps for more than 30 years. When he retired, he felt like he needed to continue his service and help the next generation.

Volunteering filled his need.

The Capability Assessment Support Center project administrator at Albany, Georgia, Scott has been with Marine Corps Systems Command for 11 years. Off the job he volunteers for the Albany Young Marine and Westover High School Football Programs in Georgia.

“Every other Saturday we meet with the kids to give back to them what I learned while I was in the Marine Corps,” Scott said. “I want to give back to the kids and pass on my leadership skills. I can tell I make a difference when I see how they interact in the city and their surroundings.”

Scott is one of almost 130 people—military and civilian—assigned to MCSC who completed more than 16,600 cumulative volunteer hours in fiscal year 2014.

“Last year was a huge volunteer year for MCSC,” said Bill Johnson-Miles, family readiness officer. “Our folks donated the most meals to the Barracks Bash and among the most gowns to the Birthday Ball Gown Giveaway event on Quantico. They definitely have huge hearts.”

Scott logged more than 350 hours volunteering in 12 months. Dan Dague, a contracts specialist at Program Manager Training Systems in Orlando, Florida, tallied more than 600 hours in his off-duty time as an auxiliary state trooper captain for the Florida Highway Patrol.

Both men will receive the President’s Volunteer Service Award—the sixth award for Scott. The award recognizes those who demonstrate outstanding volunteer service and civic participation during a 12-month period or have provided substantial service in their lifetimes.

“Generally, my volunteer work takes place on the weekends,” said Dague, who has been with MCSC seven years.

Through his volunteer work, Dague has also experienced his share of heart-stopping reality.

“The second day I was in the patrol car, a call came over the radio about a mass-casualty incident,” he recalled. “It was an Amtrak train derailment. We were the closest police unit, and we came upon the scene just as the first fire-rescue units arrived. I helped perform first aid on two injured people and then helped carry four others to ambulances and helicopters. It was surreal but rewarding that I could help.”

Leadership, paying back and paying forward to the next generation were common themes for Scott, Dague and many of the MCSC volunteers who hope to inspire others by their example.

Johnson-Miles noted that volunteers at MCSC know no bounds, giving up tens, hundreds or thousands of hours with “an amazing willingness” and even reaching across the seas.

Nancy Levesque, information security project officer with Information Systems and Infrastructure, served a combined 1,582 hours with the Richardsville Volunteer Fire Department in Virginia, United Methodist Family Services, Grace Church, Hope House and Habitat for Humanity. Patrick Elliott, also with ISI, logged 900 hours with the Nokesville Volunteer Fire Department in Virginia.

Randolph Scott summed up the point of those hundreds of donated hours, which most volunteers can agree with.

“I ask each retired Marine to give back time to help a child and pass on your leadership skill,” Scott said. “Then they can pass it to the next person.”
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