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U.S. Marine Corps recruits of Bravo Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, march during a six-mile conditioning hike on Parris Island, South Carolina. In an effort to continually improve the clothing and equipment Marines are issued, Marine Corps Systems Command will conduct an assessment to see if lighter boots can improve recruit performance. Plans are to compare two lighter boots to the Marine Corps Combat Boot during a recruit training cycle at Parris Island. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Joseph Jacob)

Photo by Lance Cpl. Joseph Jacob

Corps to assess boots at Parris Island

29 Mar 2018 | Kaitlin Kelly, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication Marine Corps Systems Command

In an effort to continually improve the clothing and equipment Marines are issued, Marine Corps Systems Command will conduct an assessment to see if lighter boots can improve recruit performance. Plans are to compare two lighter boots to the Marine Corps Combat Boot during a recruit training cycle at Parris Island.

One boot, the Danner Reckoning Hot Weather Boot was authorized for optional wear by Marine Corps Systems Command in 2017.

“The feedback we’ve received from Marines on the Reckoning boots, is positive,” said Todd Towles, project officer for the Clothing and Equipment Team at Marine Corps Systems Command. “The boots are lightweight, durable, and there’s virtually no break-in period.”

Now, program officials plan to compare the Reckoning and another relative newcomer—the Rocky Tropical boot. The Rocky Tropical performed well in jungle environments during a 2017 user evaluation with 3rd Battalion 3rd Marines in Hawaii.  

The program office will issue 700 Reckoning boots and 700 Rocky Tropical boots to male and female recruits. Half of the Danner and half of the Rocky will go to a male company and remaining boots will be issued to a female company.

The purpose of the assessment is to do a comparison between the Rocky and Reckoning and the Marine Corps Combat Boot to see if there is a decrease in lower extremity injuries.

The MCCB has been in the Corps’ inventory since 2001 and is a seabag issue item.

The three-month assessment is planned to take place this summer, Towles said.


Marine Corps Systems Command