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U.S. Marines with 1st Landing Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, I Marine Expeditionary Force work with Airmen from the 22nd Airlift Squadron, 60th Operations Group, 60th Air Mobility Wing to on-load a MAC 50 all-terrain crane onto a C5-M Super Galaxy at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi, Oct. 30, 2022. Marine Corps Systems Command has been modernizing the legacy cranes as part of the Service Life Extension Program, which includes upgraded controls and overhauled engines. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by MSgt Delsean Barrow)
U.S. Marines with 1st Landing Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, I Marine Expeditionary Force work with Airmen from the 22nd Airlift Squadron, 60th Operations Group, 60th Air Mobility Wing to offload a Mac 50 all-terrain crane from a C5-M Super Galaxy at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi, Oct. 30, 2022. Marine Corps Systems Command has been modernizing the legacy cranes as part of a Service Life Extension Program, which includes upgraded controls and overhauled engines. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Chief Warrant Officer 2 Eric LaClair)
U.S. Marines with 1st Landing Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, I Marine Expeditionary Force work with Airmen from the 22nd Airlift Squadron, 60th Operations Group, 60th Air Mobility Wing to on-load a MAC 50 all-terrain crane onto a C5-M Super Galaxy at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi, Oct. 30, 2022. Marine Corps Systems Command has been modernizing the legacy cranes as part of a Service Life Extension Program, which includes upgraded controls and overhauled engines. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Chief Warrant Officer 2 Eric LaClair)
U.S. Marines with 1st Landing Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, I Marine Expeditionary Force work with Airmen from the 22nd Airlift Squadron, 60th Operations Group, 60th Air Mobility Wing to on-load the MAC 50 all-terrain crane onto a C5-M Super Galaxy at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California, Oct. 28, 2022. Marine Corps Systems Command has been modernizing the legacy cranes as part of a Service Life Extension Program, which includes upgraded controls and overhauled engines. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Chief Warrant Officer 2 Eric LaClair)
Marine Corps Systems Command Program Manager Engineer Systems recently teamed up with II Marine Expeditionary Force, Marine Corps Logistics Command and Marine Force Storage Command to conduct an inventory of all Amphibious Assault Fuel System and Tactical Airfield Fuel Dispensing System bulk fuel assets located in storage at Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany, Georgia. Between Aug. 22 and Oct. 22, 2022, Marines inventoried and inspected legacy fuel systems to determine if the equipment is viable to fill Fleet needs and improve readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Justin Duran)
U.S. Marines with 6th Engineer Support Battalion Bulk Fuel Company B, 4th Marine Logistics Group conducting field training with the new Expeditionary Fuel Dispensing System, or EFDS. EFDS is a new program of record that reconfigures capabilities existent in legacy fuel systems, such as the Amphibious Assault Fuel System and the Tactical Airfield Fuel Dispensing System into smaller, more agile expedient capabilities. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Ryan Schmid)
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Ram Francis, a data systems administrator with Headquarters Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment, monitors network traffic and activity on Fort Pickett, Virginia, Feb. 6, 2022. Marine Corps Systems Command recently launched the Technical Management and Analysis Directorate – or TMAD – in a drive to modernize the Marine Corps Enterprise Network, or MCEN. The Marine Corps Enterprise Network, or MCEN, is an interconnected “network of networks” that links service personnel, architecture, processes, physical and logical topology, and cyber operations.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. James Stanfield)
Col. Kirk Mullins, second from left, is pictured above at his commissioning ceremony in Richmond, Ind., in Dec. 1993. Mullins was commissioned as a Marine Corps officer in 3/24 Company K alongside his three best friends, 2Lt. Shawn Coll, Cpl. Bret Hart and Sgt. Randy Hoffman. Mullins retired from the U.S. Marine Corps after 31 years of faithful service on Sept. 29, 2022, at a ceremony at Marine Corps Base Quantico’s 395-acre Transportation Demonstration Support Area.
Retired Marine Corps Col. Randy Hoffman, left, accompanied recently retired Col. Kirk Mullins during his last 20-mile ruck march in the Marine Corps. Hoffman marched 19-miles alongside Mullins, who reserved the last mile for his grandson. Hoffman and Mullins stopped to toast and remember two of their fellow Marines, 2nd Lt Shawn Coll and Lieutenant Col. Bret Hart, who have passed away.
Marine Corps Systems Command Sgt. Maj. Allen Goodyear, left, looks on as Gen. Eric M. Smith, middle, assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, congratulates Col. Kirk D. Mullins (right) on his retirement from the Marine Corps after 31 years of faithful service. The ceremony was held at Marine Corps Base Quantico’s 395-acre Transportation Demonstration Support Area on Sept. 29, 2022. Mullins was instrumental to the development, acquisition and fielding of the ACV, designed and built to replace the Corps’ legacy AAVs, which have been in service since 1972.
Col. Kirk D. Mullins is pictured above walking alongside his family towards his retirement ceremony at Marine Corps Base Quantico’s 395-acre Transportation Demonstration Support Area on Sept. 29, 2022. The ceremony was officiated by Gen. Eric M. Smith, the assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, and attended by family, friends, and former Marine Corps colleagues.
Col. Mullins was accompanied by his 8-year-old grandson, Blake, during the final mile of his 20-mile hike, representative of his expansive career in the U.S. Marine Corps. He retired from the U.S. Marine Corps after 31 years of faithful service on Sept. 29, 2022, at a ceremony at Marine Corps Base Quantico’s 395-acre Transportation Demonstration Support Area. The ceremony was officiated by Gen. Eric M. Smith, the assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, and attended by family, friends, and former Marine Corps colleagues.
Col. Mullins was accompanied by his 8-year-old grandson, Blake, during the final mile of his 20-mile hike, representative of his expansive career in the U.S. Marine Corps. He retired from the U.S. Marine Corps after 31 years of faithful service on Sept. 29, 2022, at a ceremony at Marine Corps Base Quantico’s 395-acre Transportation Demonstration Support Area. The ceremony was officiated by Gen. Eric M. Smith, the assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, and attended by family, friends and former Marine Corps colleagues.
Two participants in the latest physical training uniform (PTU) limited user evaluation (LUE) pose in the newest uniform prototype at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia.
U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Soldier Center clothing designer Emily Madden evaluates the fit of a Marine wearing Marine Corps Systems Command’s redesigned physical training uniform prototype during a limited user evaluation at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, Sept. 13, 2022.
Navy Clothing and Textile Research Facility clothing designer Katie Verrico measures a female Marine during Marine Corps Systems Command’s latest limited user evaluation of the redesigned physical training uniform prototype at Marine Corps University, Sept. 13, 2022.
Marine Corps Systems Command’s clothing and equipment team recruited Marines from across the National Capital Region to participate in a 30-day limited user evaluation of newly-redesigned physical training uniform prototypes.
The female version of the latest iteration of the physical training uniform prototype is shown here, modeled by a U.S. Marine at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia.
The male version of the latest iteration of the physical training uniform prototype is shown here, modeled by a U.S. Marine at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia.
Marine Corps Systems Command Chief Technology Officer, Luis Velazquez, briefs U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen participating in the Program Executive Officer Land Systems internship program at X Corps Solutions in Stafford, Virginia, Aug. 12, 2022. Launched in 2013, the PEO Land Systems internship program provides an avenue for midshipmen to gain practical skills and hands-on experience in military acquisitions.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Mark Hoots)