HomePhotos
How the Marine Corps uses IT to defeat evolving threats
How the Marine Corps uses IT to defeat evolving threats
Polymer-cased .50-caliber ammunition
U.S. Marine  prepare ammunition for a course of fire that tests polymer-cased rounds at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California
A machine gunner fires polymer rounds from a .50-caliber machine gun at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California
Mobile satellite system reduces communication gaps, increases naval interoperability
Mobile satellite system reduces communication gaps, increases naval interoperability
Force Design 2030: Divesting to meet the future threat
2030 and Beyond: Delivering Corps’ new wargaming center will ‘take a village’
2030 and Beyond: Delivering Corps’ new wargaming center will ‘take a village’
MCSC begins fielding amphibious robot system for littoral missions
MCSC begins fielding amphibious robot system for littoral missions
MCSC begins fielding amphibious robot system for littoral missions
TRASYS provides modernized robotic targets to bolster Marine Corps lethality
TRASYS provides modernized robotic targets to bolster Marine Corps lethality
TRASYS provides modernized robotic targets to bolster Marine Corps lethality
MCTSSA shines with DEVSTARS
An artillery Marine from 1st Battalion, 12th Marines maneuvers a Navy/Marine Corps Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System launcher across the beach aboard Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii, Aug. 16, 2021. During Large Scale Exercise 2021, the Marines of 1/12 struck a naval target ship with two Naval Strike Missiles which flew more than 100 nautical miles before striking the ship. The Marine Corps’ primary modernization priority in support of Force Design 2030 is fulfilling the requirement for a ground-based anti-ship missile capability. NMESIS is the Marine Corps’ first solution meeting this requirement. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Luke Cohen, released)
Artillery Marines from 1st Battalion, 12th Marines escort a Navy/Marine Corps Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System launcher vehicle ashore aboard Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii, Aug. 16, 2021. The Marines of 1/12 struck a naval target ship Aug. 15, 2021, with two Naval Strike Missiles, which flew 100 nautical miles away before finding their mark. The Marine Corps’ primary modernization priority in support of Force Design 2030 is fulfilling the requirement for a ground-based anti-ship missile capability. NMESIS is the Marine Corps’ first solution meeting this requirement. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Luke Cohen, released)
Pfc. Guerby Destine, 22, number two cannoneer with 1st Battalion, 12th Marines and a Westbury, New York, native, drives the teleoperated Navy/Marine Corps Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System launcher, Remotely-Operated Ground Unit for Expeditionary Fires, aboard Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii, Aug. 15, 2021. The Marines of 1/12 struck a naval target ship with two Naval Strike Missiles after sensing and targeting the vessel from their fires expeditionary advanced base while participating in Large Scale Exercise 2021. The Marine Corps’ primary modernization priority in support of Force Design 2030 is fulfilling the requirement for a ground-based anti-ship missile capability. NMESIS is the Marine Corps’ first solution meeting this requirement. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Luke Cohen, released)