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An artillery Marine from 1st Battalion, 12th Marines maneuvers a Navy/Marine Corps Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System launcher across the beach aboard Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii, Aug. 16, 2021. During Large Scale Exercise 2021, the Marines of 1/12 struck a naval target ship with two Naval Strike Missiles which flew more than 100 nautical miles before striking the ship. The Marine Corps’ primary modernization priority in support of Force Design 2030 is fulfilling the requirement for a ground-based anti-ship missile capability. NMESIS is the Marine Corps’ first solution meeting this requirement. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Luke Cohen, released)
Artillery Marines from 1st Battalion, 12th Marines escort a Navy/Marine Corps Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System launcher vehicle ashore aboard Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii, Aug. 16, 2021. The Marines of 1/12 struck a naval target ship Aug. 15, 2021, with two Naval Strike Missiles, which flew 100 nautical miles away before finding their mark. The Marine Corps’ primary modernization priority in support of Force Design 2030 is fulfilling the requirement for a ground-based anti-ship missile capability. NMESIS is the Marine Corps’ first solution meeting this requirement. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Luke Cohen, released)
Pfc. Guerby Destine, 22, number two cannoneer with 1st Battalion, 12th Marines and a Westbury, New York, native, drives the teleoperated Navy/Marine Corps Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System launcher, Remotely-Operated Ground Unit for Expeditionary Fires, aboard Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii, Aug. 15, 2021. The Marines of 1/12 struck a naval target ship with two Naval Strike Missiles after sensing and targeting the vessel from their fires expeditionary advanced base while participating in Large Scale Exercise 2021. The Marine Corps’ primary modernization priority in support of Force Design 2030 is fulfilling the requirement for a ground-based anti-ship missile capability. NMESIS is the Marine Corps’ first solution meeting this requirement. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Luke Cohen, released)
U.S. joint forces conducted coordinated multidomain, multiaxis, long-range maritime strikes in the Hawaiian Islands Operating Area during a sinking exercise on the decommissioned guided missile frigate ex-USS Ingraham Aug. 15, 2021. During the exercise, the Marine Corps launched two Naval Strike Missiles from the Navy/Marine Corps Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System; both missiles successfully hit its target. The Marine Corps’ primary modernization priority in support of Force Design 2030 is fulfilling the requirement for a ground-based anti-ship missile capability. NMESIS is the Marine Corps’ first solution meeting this requirement. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David Mora Jr.)
Island Marauder 21: MCSC collaborates with Navy, prepares for maritime combat
Island Marauder 21: MCSC collaborates with Navy, prepares for maritime combat
Island Marauder 21: MCSC collaborates with Navy, prepares for maritime combat
Island Marauder 21: MCSC collaborates with Navy, prepares for maritime combat
Island Marauder 21: MCSC collaborates with Navy, prepares for maritime combat
Marines 3D print a rocket headcap for mine-clearing missions
Marines 3D print a rocket headcap for mine-clearing missions
Awarding Excellence: MCSC Marines, civilians recognized for acquisition efforts
Awarding Excellence: MCSC Marines, civilians recognized for acquisition efforts
Awarding Excellence: MCSC Marines, civilians recognized for acquisition efforts
Awarding Excellence: MCSC Marines, civilians recognized for acquisition efforts
A Naval Strike Missile streaks out to sea before striking a naval target ship, Aug. 15, 2021, aboard Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii. The missile flew more than 100 nautical miles before finding its mark. The live-fire sinking exercise demonstrated a Marine fires expeditionary advanced base’s ability to sense, target and strike a target at sea, providing sea control or contributing to sea denial in fleet operations. The Marine Corps’ Force Design 2030 centers on Marines providing long-range precision strike capabilities as a stand-in force during littoral operations in a contested environment. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Dillon Buck, released)
A Navy Marine Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System launcher deploys into position aboard Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii, Aug. 16, 2021. The NMESIS and its Naval Strike Missiles participated in a live-fire exercise, here, part of Large Scale Exercise 2021. During the training, a Marine Corps fires expeditionary advanced base sensed, located, identified and struck a target ship at sea, which required more than 100 nautical miles of missile flight. The fires EAB Marines developed a targeting solution for a joint force of seapower and airpower which struck the ship as the Marines displaced to a new firing position. The Marine Corps EABO concept is a core component of the Force Design 2030 modernization effort. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Nick Mannweiler, released)
Artillery Marines from 1st Battalion, 12th Marines provide security as a Marine KC-130J loadmaster deploys a Navy Marine Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System launcher aboard Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii, Aug. 15, 2021. After striking a naval target ship with two Naval Strike Missiles flying 100 nautical miles, 1/12 rehearsed tactical displacement and relocation. A key component of the Marine Corps’ Force Design 2030, expeditionary advanced base operations include low-signature, dispersed teams of Marines holding a potential adversary’s ships at risk from long-range precision strike weapons, providing sea control and contributing to sea denial in support of the Fleet. The training, part of Large Scale Exercise 2021, allowed Marines to refine support to distributed maritime operations by providing expeditionary advanced base operations and littoral operations in a contested environment.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Luke Cohen, released)
A Navy Marine Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System launcher, a command and control vehicle and a Joint Light Tactical Vehicle are transported by a U.S. Navy Landing Craft Air Cushion from Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii, out to U.S.S. San Diego, Aug. 16, 2021. The movement demonstrated the mobility of a Marine Corps fires expeditionary advanced base, a core concept in the Marine Corps’ Force Design 2030 efforts. U.S. Navy and Marine Corps units came together from across 17 time zones as they participated in Large Scale Exercise 2021. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Luke Cohen, released)
Cpl. Brooks Woodhill, a transmissions systems operator, and Staff Sgt. Thomas King, a transmissions chief, both of 3rd Marine Regiment, use the Mobile User Objective System during Island Marauder 2021 Aug. 11 at Marine Corps Base Hawaii. Island Marauder is an annual, Marine Corps Systems Command-led exercise enabling Marines to assess and familiarize themselves with communications gear. This year’s exercise was nested under the Navy’s Large Scale Exercise. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Ashley Calingo)