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Archive: May, 2016
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Brig. Gen Joseph Shrader, commander of Marine Corps Systems Command, looks over the Dry Super Absorbing Fabric, or DrySAF, during the Navy’s Forum for Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer Transition May 16. MCSC’s SBIR/STTR program gives small businesses the opportunity to develop innovative advances in technologies to address Marine Corps needs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Barb Hamby) - Brig. Gen Joseph Shrader, commander of Marine Corps Systems Command, looks over the Dry Super Absorbing Fabric, or DrySAF, during the Navy’s Forum for Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer Transition May 16. MCSC’s SBIR/STTR program gives small businesses the opportunity to develop innovative advances in technologies to address Marine Corps needs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Barb Hamby)

Marine Corps Systems Command Commander Brig. Gen. Joseph Shrader (center) joined Navy and Coast Guard acquisition leaders to discuss the future of equipping and sustaining the sea services at the Navy League’s Sea Air Space Global Maritime Exposition at National Harbor, Maryland, May 18. He outlined the top four acquisition challenges and opportunities the Corps is addressing to ensure readiness today and tomorrow. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Ashley Calingo) - Marine Corps Systems Command Commander Brig. Gen. Joseph Shrader (center) joined Navy and Coast Guard acquisition leaders to discuss the future of equipping and sustaining the sea services at the Navy League’s Sea Air Space Global Maritime Exposition at National Harbor, Maryland, May 18. He outlined the top four acquisition challenges and opportunities the Corps is addressing to ensure readiness today and tomorrow. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Ashley Calingo)

A Marine with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, fires on virtual targets with an Mk-19 automatic grenade launcher during training at the Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Trainer aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug. 5, 2015. The ISMT—used to train Marines on Mk 19s, M2 50-caliber machine guns, M240 medium machine guns and M16 service rifles—will be part of the Marine Corps Systems Command display at Sea Air Space May 16-18. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Sullivan Laramie) - A Marine with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, fires on virtual targets with an Mk-19 automatic grenade launcher during training at the Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Trainer aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug. 5, 2015. The ISMT—used to train Marines on Mk 19s, M2 50-caliber machine guns, M240 medium machine guns and M16 service rifles—will be part of the Marine Corps Systems Command display at Sea Air Space May 16-18. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Sullivan Laramie)

Becky Marx, a reserve emergency medical technician, transports a role player to an ambulance during an active shooter exercise at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California. The Marine Corps is the first service to standardize E911 capabilities. The Consolidated Emergency Response Systems Program is implementing a product suite used across the nation by emergency dispatchers to locate the caller’s location on a graphical display by GPS, thus increasing response time. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Charles Santamaria) - Becky Marx, a reserve emergency medical technician, transports a role player to an ambulance during an active shooter exercise at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California. The Marine Corps is the first service to standardize E911 capabilities. The Consolidated Emergency Response Systems Program is implementing a product suite used across the nation by emergency dispatchers to locate the caller’s location on a graphical display by GPS, thus increasing response time. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Charles Santamaria)

Marine Corps Systems Command’s Expeditionary Power Systems recently conducted new equipment training for the Expeditionary Water Distribution System with Marine Wing Support Squadron 371 in Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona. EWDS is the Marine Expeditionary Force and division-level’s bulk water supply, distribution and dispensing system, replacing the Tactical Water Distribution System. The modular system is leaner and easier to assemble than the TWDS, and is capable of delivering 700,000 gallons of water a day. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Jennifer Stephens) - Marine Corps Systems Command’s Expeditionary Power Systems recently conducted new equipment training for the Expeditionary Water Distribution System with Marine Wing Support Squadron 371 in Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona. EWDS is the Marine Expeditionary Force and division-level’s bulk water supply, distribution and dispensing system, replacing the Tactical Water Distribution System. The modular system is leaner and easier to assemble than the TWDS, and is capable of delivering 700,000 gallons of water a day. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Jennifer Stephens)

Marine Corps Systems Command